A recent study reveals that the Bible serves as an important tool for Christians in the UK in coping up with the COVID-19 pandemic.

The survey, commissioned by the Bible study app WordGo and conducted by Savanta ComRes, found that more than three in five regular churchgoers said the Bible has been a lifeline when dealing with the challenges brought by the pandemic. The report also showed that some 73% of churchgoing adults said the Bible is important to them to have a personal relationship with God, according the Keep the Faith.

Simon Lennox, Director of WordGo, welcomes the findings of the study. “It is encouraging to hear of people being comforted by God through the Bible in these challenging times. This shows us the genuine impact of Bible engagement on our lives.”

It is encouraging to hear of people being comforted by God through the Bible in these challenging times. This shows us the genuine impact of Bible engagement on our lives. —Simon Lennox, Director of WordGo

The survey involved 1,095 Christian adults from the UK and showed that more than 60% of Christians who attend religious services regularly felt that the Bible helped them feel encouraged and motivated during the crisis.

Lennox stressed the importance of having a relationship with God, especially now that the world is dealing with a deadly virus. He said engaging with the Bible brings “timeless wisdom and genuine peace.” He also added that, “The most radical thing we can do for our mental and spiritual health during this season is to be in conversation with God, in prayer and in Scripture.”

Dr. Rowan Williams, the former archbishop of Canterbury, is unsurprised by the increase in Bible-reading among Christians, saying the pandemic has started a “historic spiritual moment,” reports The New Statesman.

Several Bible apps have been installed in record-numbers since March. According to Appfigures, the English language Bible on Google Play and App Store was installed almost 2 million times, and one of the UK’s largest online Christian bookstore, Eden, recorded a Bible sales increase of 55% in April.

It is also noteworthy that online church services are seeing an increase in engagement. Dr. Williams said the pandemic caused feelings of disorientation, fragility and fear in people. “Online, one can preserve a measure of anonymity. You can tune into something without committing yourself, and expose yourself to something fresh,” he explained.

One of the UK’s largest churches, Holy Trinity Brompton (HTB) welcomed the increase in online engagement among Christians and non-religious. The church has a course called Alpha where non-believers are encouraged to ask questions about faith and Christianity.

HTB’s vicar Nicky Gumbel said the lockdown made people more open to God’s word than before. “There are no other distractions. There’s no football, there’s no sport. There’s no entertainment. People have time to hear the Gospel.”

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Joyce has more than 15 years experience writing news, industry articles and blogs for the private and public sectors. Most of her career was spent writing technical documentation for a software company in the Philippines. She earned a B.A. in Communication Arts with a concentration in writing from the University of the Philippines, Los Baños. During her leisure time, Joyce pursues her interest in reading fiction and playing with her dogs. She can be contacted at Joyce@onechristianvoice.com.
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